Your best source for news in Huerfano | Las Animas | Colfax

Passover Seder at Temple Aaron Landmark Trinidad synagogue is listed as one of Colorado’s endangered places

by Carol Bridge
Randy Rubin led the Seder service last weekend at Temple Aaron in Trinidad. In front of him is the Seder plate, or ka’arah, contains the ceremonial foods for the service, including bitter herbs, symbolize the bitterness of affliction; salt water reminiscent of the saltiness of the tears and sweat of slavery, the shank bone, or zeroa, which represents the Paschal sacrifice made the night the Hebrews fled Egypt; a roasted egg and karpas (a green vegetable or boiled potato) which represent the freshness of springtime and renewal; charoset, which represents the mortar the Hebrews used to make bricks for building Egyptian cities; and matzoh, the unleavened bread symbolizing of the haste of the Hebrews as they fled Egypt. Photo by Carol Bridge.

TRINIDAD — About 60 people from all over the region came together to celebrate a Seder at Temple Aaron in Trinidad.  Seder is a meal that remembers the Jewish slavery in Egypt and celebrates the people’s  joyful release from bondage.  It is a  meal designed to teach children the story of oppression and restoration and it is commemorated by eating special foods, drinking wine, telling stories, reciting poems and prayers and fellowship.   The word ‘Seder’ simply means ‘order’ and the rules of the service, which have been carried out for 3,000 years, are found in a book called a Haggadah, which translates to, “telling”.

Temple Aaron is a state and nationally recognized endangered landmark building and a group of concerned people are seeking funds to maintain it until it can be re purposed into something appropriate.  The Temple closed to regular services in 2016 but remains in place for special occasions.  When it was built in 1889 it served a vibrant Jewish community and stands as a tribute to the multiculturalism that has existed in the area.

The original cost of the building was $12,000 and raised by the congregation and they erected a wondrous building complete with an onion dome, stained glass, gorgeous workmanship and an organ shipped by wagon. For decades the Rubin family of Raton has served as the building’s caretakers and, now that Kathryn Rubin is unable to attend to this task, her son, Randy now carries the local mantle.  An impressive group of Jewish people assembled for this Seder, among them Rabbi Schlachter who is also a PhD physicist from Los Alamos – David London, a Boulder attorney who has taken a special interest in the project, along with a representative from the Colorado Preservation, Inc.

Randy Rubin led the Seder service last weekend at Temple Aaron in Trinidad. In front of him is the Seder plate, or ka’arah, contains the ceremonial foods for the service, including bitter herbs, symbolize the bitterness of affliction; salt water reminiscent of the saltiness of the tears and sweat of slavery, the shank bone, or zeroa, which represents the Paschal sacrifice made the night the Hebrews fled Egypt; a roasted egg and karpas (a green vegetable or boiled potato) which represent the freshness of springtime and renewal; charoset, which represents the mortar the Hebrews used to make bricks for building Egyptian cities; and matzoh, the unleavened bread symbolizing of the haste of the Hebrews as they fled Egypt. Photo by Carol Bridge.
http://coloradopreservation.org/2014-list-colorados-most-endangered-places/temple-aaron/

Latest from Celebrations

Huajatolla Heritage

The Huajatolla Heritage Foundation held two events in La Veta on September
Go to Top